Nathaniel Hawthorne Quotes

Nathaniel Hawthorne Quotes: The moment when a man's head drops off is seldom or never, I am inclined to think, precisely the most agreeable of his life. Nevertheless, like the greater part of our misfortunes, even so serious a contingency brings its remedy and consolation with it, if the sufferer will but make the best, rather than the worst, of the accident which has befallen him.
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Nathaniel Hawthorne Quote: The washing of dishes does seem to me the most absurd and unsatisfactory business that I ever undertook. If, when once washed, they would remain clean for ever and ever (which they ought in all reason to do, considering how much trouble it is), there would be less occasion to grumble; but no sooner is it done, than it requires to be done again. On the whole, I have come to the resolution not to use more than one dish at each meal.
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Quotes about Nathaniel Hawthorne: To be left alone in the wide world with scarcely a friend,--this makes the sadness which, striking its pang into the minds of the young and the affectionate, teaches them too soon to watch and interpret the spirit-signs of their own hearts.
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Quote about Nathaniel Hawthorne: The marble keeps merely a cold and sad memory of a man who would else be forgotten. No man who needs a monument ever ought to have one.
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Nathaniel Hawthorne Sayings: Be true! Be true! Be true! Show freely to the world, if not your worst, yet some trait whereby the worst may be inferred!
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Nathaniel Hawthorne Saying: There is something more awful in happiness than in sorrow--the latter being earthly and finite, the former composed of the substance and texture of eternity, so that spirits still embodied may well tremble at it.
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Sayings about Nathaniel Hawthorne: I heard a neigh. Oh, such a brisk and melodious neigh it was. My very heart leapt with the sound.
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Saying about Nathaniel Hawthorne: It is not good for man to cherish a solitary ambition. Unless there be those around him, by whose example he may regulate himself, his thoughts, desires, and hopes will become extravagant, and he the semblance, perhaps the reality, of a madman
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Nathaniel Hawthorne Quotes: The moment when a man's head drops off is seldom or never, I am inclined to think, precisely the most agreeable of his life.
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Nathaniel Hawthorne Quote: Religion and art spring from the same root and are close kin. Economics and art are strangers.
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Quotes about Nathaniel Hawthorne: Death possesses a good deal, of real estate, namely, the graveyard in every town.
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Quote about Nathaniel Hawthorne: Language,-human language,-after all is but little better than the croak and cackle of fowls, and other utterances of brute nature,-sometimes not so adequate.
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Nathaniel Hawthorne Sayings: It is not strange that that early love of the heart should come back, as it so often does when the dim eye is brightening with its last light. It is not strange that the freshest fountains the heart has ever known in its wastes should bubble up anew when the lifeblood is growing stagnant. It is not strange that a bright memory should come to a dying old man, as the sunshine breaks across the hills at the close of a stormy day; nor that in the light of that ray, the very clouds that made the day dark should grow gloriously beautiful.
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Nathaniel Hawthorne Saying: It was one of those moments
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Sayings about Nathaniel Hawthorne: We dream in our waking moments, and walk in our sleep.
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Saying about Nathaniel Hawthorne: it is a curious subject of observation and inquiry, whether hatred and love be not the same thing at bottom.
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Nathaniel Hawthorne Quotes: It will startle you to see what slaves we are to by-gone times-to Death, if we give the matter the right word! ... We read in Dead Men's books! We laugh at Dead Men's jokes, and cry at Dead Men's pathos! . . . Whatever we seek to do, of our own free motion, a Dead Man's icy hand obstructs us!
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Nathaniel Hawthorne Quote: Why are poets so apt to choose their mates, not for any similarity of poetic endowment, but for qualities which might make the happiness of the rudest handicraftsman as well as that of the ideal craftsman of the spirit? Because, probably, at his highest elevation, the poet needs no human intercourse; but he finds it dreary to descend, and be a stranger.
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